Sectors

Aquaculture

Legumes

Poultry

Sesame

Spices

Poultry Special Issue

Read our Poultry Special Issue-February-2019, which presents information about major results of ENTAG under the sub-sector.

Read our Poultry Special Issue-February-2019, which presents information about major results of ENTAG under the sub-sector.

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Company Profile_Poultry, Aquaculture and Legumes

The ENTAG programme has been working on company profiles in its four subsectors; more than 100 company profiles are now published (more)

The ENTAG programme has been working on company profiles in its four subsectors; more than 100 company profiles are now published and additional profiles are still being compiled. The profiles are being used by sector actors as source of information about who is doing what in four of the main subsectors. 

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STRATEGIC PLAN for implementation of disease prevention and control in the commercial poultry sector of Ethiopia 2018

The livestock production in Ethiopia is in a period of transition. The transition from traditional farming towards a more industrial form of farming is a necessary to meet the... (more)

The livestock production in Ethiopia is in a period of transition. The transition from traditional farming towards a more industrial form of farming is a necessary to meet the increased demand of growing population of the country as it is mentioned in GTP I and II. The transition requires a coherent strategy and structure for poultry health and disease control and prevention.

The Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock Resource (MoALR) (former Ministry of Livestock and Fishery (MoLF)) has requested the Ethiopia Netherland Trade for Agricultural Growth (ENTAG) program to provide support in developing the strategic plan to strengthen the poultry health and disease control and prevention in Ethiopia. ENTAG has called for the services of the GD Animal Health in The Netherlands, which together with ENTAG staff implemented developed the strategic plan with input and reflections of the relevant Ethiopian stakeholders.

The objective of this report is, based on the analysis and discussions during numerous workshops, to advise on the structure and to describe a feasible strategic plan for organized poultry health control by the government in Ethiopia that can be endorsed by the private poultry industry, so that the Ethiopian government can support the poultry sector in increasing production to the desired level.

The strategic plan focuses on the following topics:

  • Organization of poultry industry, farm locations and flock registration
  • Poultry health management » Organization of epidemiological data
  • Surveillance programs for specific poultry diseases
  • Monitoring the effect of disease control and inter- vention programs
  • Organization of poultry diagnostics
  • Collaboration between governmental and private stakeholders

The download link for the full report can be found on this page. 

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Investment opportunities in the Ethiopian: Oilseeds and pulses sub-sector

The potential for Ethiopian sesame on the world market is still significant because of the high-quality seed varieties produced that are suitable for a wide... (more)

The potential for Ethiopian sesame on the world market is still significant because of the high-quality seed varieties produced that are suitable for a wide range of applications.

Despite the high export figures for sesame, Ethiopia still imports a variety of oil substitutes. In particular, palm oil imported from Malaysia is widely used for cooking, given its superior price-to-quality ratio com- pared to domestically produced oil. Dr Daniel Dauro from the Agricultural Transformation Agency states:

“One policy that is hindering the domestic processing of oilseeds is the duty-free importation of foreign edible oils. Palm oil is not taxed, while locally produced oil is. Imported palm oil from, for example Malaysia and Indonesia, is duty-free in order to make it affordable to the majority of the population. Less than 5% is produced in Ethiopia itself.”

Thus, the need for affordable edible oils cannot be met by domestic production alone, but largely through duty-free imports from Asia. At the same time this hinders efforts to develop Ethiopian production of edible oils from oilseeds.

Read the full report on the download link.

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Investment opportunities in the Ethiopian Dairy sector

Some facts about the Dairy sector in Ethiopia:

  • The total volume of milk produced in Ethiopia has gradually increased over the last 15 years from less than 1 billion liters to... (more)

Some facts about the Dairy sector in Ethiopia:

  • The total volume of milk produced in Ethiopia has gradually increased over the last 15 years from less than 1 billion liters to 3.0 billion litres in 2014/15.
  • The dairy sector contributes considerably to the national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). It has a share of 40% in the agricultural GDP and 12–16% in the national GDP. The latter is about twice as high as it is in neigh- bouring countries in Eastern Africa, mainly because of the significantly higher share of agriculture in the Ethiopian GDP.
  • The Government of Ethiopia plans to almost double domestic milk pro- duction between 2015 and 2020. This increase will require investments and improvements in yields of fodder crops, feeding, genetics, health, and dairy processing.
  • Ethiopia imports a significant amount of dairy products and decreasing this will reduce foreign currency spending on imports.
  • Over the next five years the government is not only aiming at a decrease in dairy imports, but is also working on a dairy policy that will result in the export of dairy products.

Read the full report on the download link.

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Investment opportunities in the Ethiopian Legumes sub-sector

Ethiopia is the second most populous country in Africa with a total popula- tion of over 100 million. Agriculture accounts for 39% of the national GDP and 80% of national... (more)

Ethiopia is the second most populous country in Africa with a total popula- tion of over 100 million. Agriculture accounts for 39% of the national GDP and 80% of national employment. The Ethiopian agricultural sector is made up of predominantly smallholder farmers. According to CSA (2015/16) the country had close to 12.5 million ha land covered by grain production, with Oromia, Amhara and SNNPR accounting for close to 90%. From the total stock of agricultural production, cereals, pulses and oilseeds account for 87%, 10.5% and 2%, respectively.

Pulses are important food and cash crops in Ethiopia. The country produces close to 2.80 million MT of pulses per year with an estimated annual value of US$ 2 billion. They account for 10% and 13% of the national annual produc- tion and coverage, respectively by smallholder farmers. Though inconsistent, the volume of pulse production has increased by over 400,000 MT between 2012 and 2017. The increase is attributed to both increased area coverage as well as improved yield/ ha. Faba bean, chickpea and haricot bean are the most prominent pulses, accounting for over 78% of the total pulse production. On the other hand, mung bean and soybean are fast emerging pulses, particularly in the lowland areas with quadruple and doubling production growths between 2012 and 2017. Oromia and Amhara regions are the leading producers of pulses accounting for over 85% of the national pulse production, while the SNNPR region accounts for 13%.

Read the full report on the download link.

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Investment opportunities in the Ethiopian: Aquaculture sub-sector

Ethiopia is a country in the horn of Africa endowed with numerous aquatic resources, including over 20 natural lakes, 12 large river basins, over 75 wetlands, and 15 reservoirs.... (more)

Ethiopia is a country in the horn of Africa endowed with numerous aquatic resources, including over 20 natural lakes, 12 large river basins, over 75 wetlands, and 15 reservoirs. Micro and macro-dam construction and river impoundment have created innumerable large and small water bodies. Both inland capture fisheries and aquaculture activities are concentrated around the many lakes and rivers in the Rift Valley, as well as around the Blue Nile, which supplies water to the country’s largest water body, Lake Tana.

Aquaculture farms in Ethiopia are small-scale, subsistence- oriented and only to a certain degree commercial. It is estimated that there are more than 1300 subsistence fish farmers in Ethiopia with a pond size of about 100–300 m². The main species farmed is tilapia. Most pond fish farmers combine fish farming with irrigation, crop farming and horticulture. Candidate species for aquaculture include tilapia (O. niloticus) and the African catfish (Clarias spp). Limited research activities are underway.

Aquaculture production in Ethiopia has not really taken off, and is rather a potential than an actual practice. Accurate data on production volumes are not documented. However, according to FAO estimates, in recent years production has increased from 15 to 25 tonnes annually.

The Ethiopian government has identified aquaculture as one of the strategic areas of intervention to address the problem of food insecurity and poverty in the rural areas. It is considered an important economic activity that supports diversification, integration and improvement in rural livelihoods (MoA and FAO, 2009). The government recently re-emphasised the significance of fish culture through a joint effort with the FAO Sub-Regional Office for Eastern Africa (FAOSFE) to draw up a National Aquaculture Development Strategy (NADS), which was approved at the end of 2009. The overall objective of the strategy is to define a regulatory framework and to build a strong basis for the development of aquaculture in the country.

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Sesame Processing Study

Ethiopia is exporting more than 90% of its sesame production as a raw product. Value addition for exports is limited, but the GoE wants to see this changed in... (more)

Ethiopia is exporting more than 90% of its sesame production as a raw product. Value addition for exports is limited, but the GoE wants to see this changed in the coming years. Humera type sesame is preferred for tahini (especially in Israel), where it is used to make halva and hummus. These three products have their origins in the Middle East.

Tahini, halva and hummus have gained popularity in the USA and Western Europe in recent years and the products are being innovated on. New flavors are coming forward, which are not previously seen in Middle Eastern countries. These products, found in the higher price segment, have labeled their product with ‘Humera sesame’. End-consumers in Western nations find it more and more important to know where their food is coming from and this offers opportunities for Humera type sesame.

National markets for tahini, halva and hummus are relatively new and can be further explored. All three products are unknown by most Ethiopian consumers, but all of them have a potential to fit in Ethiopian diets. The diaspora and expatriate community can initially be targeted with potential spillover effects to the Ethiopian community.

The GoE is setting up industrial parks throughout the country for, amongst others, food processing. These industrial parks are expected to accommodate FDI and Ethiopian initiatives targeting export markets. Ethiopian entrepreneurs face challenges acquiring the machines necessary for their processing operations due to nationwide forex problems. This is one of the reasons why food processing for exports is better incentivized than food processing for local markets: foreign investors face less difficulties on this issue.

Key Ingredients for tahini, halva and hummus are sesame, sugar and chickpeas and all are produced in large quantities in the country. Their supply chains are quite different from one another. The ECX is influencing sesame supply, sugar supply is controlled by state-owned enterprise ESC and chickpea supply is rather fragmented. Organically certified sesame is being cultivated and marketed in Ethiopia but organic sugar and chickpea are much harder to find.

Key challenges identified for tahini, halva and hummus processing are adulteration along the value chain, limited Ethiopian knowledge of tahini processing, conducive environment for exports only, high raw material costs, and forex shortages. The key opportunities are an increased interest in new foods in Western markets; limited 100% pure Humera type tahini on the international market; organic tahini for the Western market; new product development with traditional tahini, halva or hummus as a basis for domestic markets.

It is recommended by this study to brand Ethiopian Humera sesame products. There is currently no guarantee that the existing Humera sesame products, are truly made of 100% Humera type sesame. This provides a great opportunity for Ethiopia-based processors (if they can guarantee this). It is recommended to increase international awareness on the high quality traits of 100% Humera type sesame products.

Secondly, it is recommended to create a more conducive environment for Ethiopian entrepreneurs to grow their sesame processing business. Expansion of local markets for THH can provide entrepreneurs with a testing ground for THH business propositions. Incentivizing (e.g. similar benefits as FDI for export markets) and supporting (e.g. domestic market promotion) those entrepreneurs to grow towards higher standards applicable in international markets, can motivate and take away start-up barriers for Ethiopian entrepreneurs wanting to engage in the THH processing business.

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